deaf

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See also: Deaf

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English dēaf, from Proto-Germanic *daubaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

deaf (comparative deafer, superlative deafest)

  1. Unable to hear, or only partially able to hear.
    • Shakespeare
      Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf.
    • Dryden
      Deaf with the noise, I took my hasty flight.
  2. Unwilling to listen or be persuaded; determinedly inattentive; regardless.
    Those people are deaf to reason.
    • Shakespeare
      O, that men's ears should be / To counsel deaf, but not to flattery!
  3. Obscurely heard; stifled; deadened.
    • Dryden
      A deaf murmur through the squadron went.
  4. (obsolete, UK, dialect) Decayed; tasteless; dead.
    a deaf nut; deaf corn
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    • Holland
      If the season be unkindly and intemperate, they [peppers] will catch a blast; and then the seeds will be deaf, void, light, and naught.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

deaf

  1. Deaf people considered as a group.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

deaf (third-person singular simple present deafs, present participle deafing, simple past and past participle deafed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To deafen.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *daubaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (smoky, foggy, dim). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian dāf, Old Saxon dōf (Low German dow), Old High German toub (German taub), Old Norse daufr (Swedish döv). The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek τυφλός (tyflós, blind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dēaf

  1. deaf

Declension[edit]