sort

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See also: sórt, sòrt, sört, and şort

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French sorte (class, kind), from Latin root of sors (lot, fate, share, rank, category)

Noun[edit]

sort (plural sorts)

  1. A general type.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes like
        Here's rattling good luck and roaring good cheer, / With lashings of food and great hogsheads of beer. […]”
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, The China Governess[2]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. […]. He was not a mongol but there was a deficiency of a sort there, and it was not made more pretty by a latter-day hair cut which involved eccentrically long elf-locks and oiled black curls.
    • 2013 June 14, Sam Leith, “Where the profound meets the profane”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 37: 
      Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths.
  2. Manner; form of being or acting.
    • Spenser
      Which for my part I covet to perform, / In sort as through the world I did proclaim.
    • Hooker
      Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt nor seen well by those that wear them.
    • Shakespeare
      I'll deceive you in another sort.
    • Milton
      To Adam in what sort / Shall I appear?
    • Dryden
      I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style.
  3. (obsolete) Condition above the vulgar; rank.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  4. (dated) Group, company.
    • Spenser
      a sort of shepherds
    • Dryden
      a sort of doves
    • Massinger
      a sort of rogues
    • Chapman
      A boy, a child, and we a sort of us, / Vowed against his voyage.
  5. (informal) A person.
    This guy's a decent sort.
  6. An act of sorting.
    I had a sort of my cupboard.
  7. (computing) An algorithm for sorting a list of items into a particular sequence.
    Popular sorts include quicksort and heapsort.
  8. (typography) A piece of metal type used to print one letter, character, or symbol in a particular size and style.
  9. (obsolete) Chance; lot; destiny.
  10. (obsolete) A pair; a set; a suit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
Quotations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French sortir (allot, sort), from Latin sortire (draw lots, divide, choose), from sors

Verb[edit]

sort (third-person singular simple present sorts, present participle sorting, simple past and past participle sorted)

  1. (transitive) To separate according to certain criteria.
    • Isaac Newton
      Rays which differ in refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another.
  2. (transitive) To arrange into some order, especially numerically, alphabetically or chronologically.
  3. (UK) To fix a problem, to handle a task; to sort out.
  4. (transitive) To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.
    • Francis Bacon
      Shellfish have been, by some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insects.
    • Sir J. Davies
      She sorts things present with things past.
  5. (intransitive) To join or associate with others, especially with others of the same kind or species; to agree.
    • Woodward
      Nor do metals only sort and herd with metals in the earth, and minerals with minerals.
    • Francis Bacon
      The illiberality of parents towards children makes them base, and sort with any company.
  6. (intransitive) To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.
    • Francis Bacon
      They are happy whose natures sort with their vocations.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I cannot tell ye precisely how they sorted.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.
    • Shakespeare
      I pray thee, sort thy heart to patience.
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To choose from a number; to select; to cull.
    • Chapman
      that he may sort out a worthy spouse
    • Shakespeare
      I'll sort some other time to visit you.
Usage notes[edit]

In British sense “to fix a problem”, often used in the form “I’ll get you sorted,” or “Now that’s sorted,” – in American usage sort out is used instead.

Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

sort f (uncountable)

  1. luck
  2. fortune

Derived terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse svartr (black), from Proto-Germanic *swartaz, from Proto-Indo-European *swordo- (dirty, dark, black).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sort (neuter sort, definite and plural sorte)

  1. black (absorbing all light)

Etymology 2[edit]

From French sorte (class, kind), from Latin sors (lot, fate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sort c (singular definite sorten, plural indefinite sorter)

  1. sort, kind
  2. quality
  3. brand
  4. (botany) cultivar
Inflection[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sors, sortis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sort m (plural sorts)

  1. lot, fate
  2. spell (magical incantation)

Verb[edit]

sort

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sortir

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sord (alternative orthography)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin surdus.

Adjective[edit]

sort

  1. deaf

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English shorts. [1]

Noun[edit]

sort (plural sortok)

  1. shorts (pants worn primarily in the summer that do not go lower than the knees)
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

sor (line) +‎ -t (accusative case ending)

Noun[edit]

sort

  1. accusative singular of sor

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sors, sortem.

Noun[edit]

sort m (plural sorts)

  1. fate

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse svartr; compare with Danish sort

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

svart

Adjective[edit]

sort (neuter singular sort, definite singular and plural sorte, comparative sortere, indefinite plural sortest, definite plural sorteste)

  1. black (colour)

Etymology 2[edit]

From French sorte

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sort m (definite singular sorten, indefinite plural sorter, definite plural sortene)

  1. a sort, kind or type

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French sorte

Noun[edit]

sort m (definite singular sorten, indefinite plural sortar, definite plural sortane)

  1. a sort, kind or type

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sort c

  1. sort, kind

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]