glib

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably modification of Low German glibberig (slippery) or a shortening of English glibbery (slippery).

Adjective[edit]

glib (comparative glibber, superlative glibbest)

  1. Having a ready flow of words but lacking thought or understanding; superficial; shallow.
  2. Smooth or slippery.
    a sheet of glib ice
  3. Artfully persuasive in nature.
    a glib tongue; a glib speech
    • Shakespeare
      I want that glib and oily art, / To speak and purpose not.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

glib (third-person singular simple present glibs, present participle glibbing, simple past and past participle glibbed)

  1. (transitive) To make glib.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Irish glib.

Noun[edit]

glib (plural glibs)

  1. (historical) A mass of matted hair worn down over the eyes, formerly worn in Ireland.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.8:
      Whom when she saw in wretched weedes disguiz'd, / With heary glib deform'd and meiger face, / Like ghost late risen from his grave agryz'd, / She knew him not […].
    • Spenser
      The Irish have, from the Scythians, mantles and long glibs, which is a thick curled bush of hair hanging down over their eyes, and monstrously disguising them.
    • Southey
      Their wild costume of the glib and mantle.

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare Old English and dialect lib to castrate, geld, Danish dialect live, Low German and Old Dutch lubben.

Verb[edit]

glib (third-person singular simple present glibs, present participle glibbing, simple past and past participle glibbed)

  1. (obsolete) To castrate; to geld; to emasculate.
    • 1623: William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, Act II Scene 1
      Fourteen they shall not see
      To bring false generations. They are co-heirs;
      And I had rather glib myself than they
      Should not produce fair issue.


Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *glibъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glȋb m (Cyrillic spelling гли̑б)

  1. mud, mire

Declension[edit]