hinterland

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Hinterland, from hinter (behind) +‎ Land (land), cognate to English hind (back, rear) + land. First used in English in 1888 by George Chisholm in his work Handbook of Commercial Geography originally as hinderland, but current spelling (following German) became more popular.[1] The term is characteristic of thalassocratic analysis of space (from the point of view of nation, such as 19th century Britain, with maritime supremacy).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɪntə(ɹ)ˌlænd/

Noun[edit]

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Wikipedia

hinterland (plural hinterlands)

  1. The land immediately next to, and inland from, a coast.
  2. The rural territory surrounding an urban area, especially a port.
  3. A remote or undeveloped area, a backwater.
  4. (figuratively) That which is unknown or unexplored about someone.
  5. (figuratively) Anything vague or ill-defined, especially one that is ill understood.
    • 2007, Lesley Jeffries, Textual Construction of the Female Body, abstract
      This approach utilizes concepts such as naming, describing, contrasting and equating to access the hinterland between structure and meaning, and to map out the subtle ways in which texts can naturalise the ideology of the perfect female form.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ hinterland”, Encyclopædia Britannica]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Hinterland.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hinterland n (plural hinterlanden, diminutive hinterlandje n)

  1. hinterland (rural territory, backwater)

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

hinterland m (invariable)

  1. hinterland, interior