nait

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See also: näit, naît, and NAIT

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English naiten, nayten, from Old Norse neita, later variant of Old Norse níta (to deny, refuse), from Proto-Germanic *niitjaną (to say 'no', deny, refuse), from Proto-Germanic *ne (no, not). Cognate with Icelandic neita (to deny), Danish nægte (to deny), Old English nǣtan (to annoy, afflict, press upon, trample upon, crush, subdue, injure, destroy). More at nyte, nay.

Verb[edit]

nait (third-person singular simple present naits, present participle naiting, simple past and past participle naited)

  1. (transitive) To refuse; deny; disclaim.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English naiten, nayten, from Old Norse neyta (to use, employ), from Proto-Germanic *nautijaną (to use), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with Icelandic neyta (to make use of, employ). Related also to Icelandic nýta (to use, make use of), Old English nēotan (to use, make use of, have the use of, have the benefit of, enjoy, employ). More at note.

Verb[edit]

nait (third-person singular simple present naits, present participle naiting, simple past and past participle naited)

  1. (transitive) To use; employ.
  2. (transitive) To go over; recite; repeat.
  3. (reflexive) To exert oneself.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English naite, from Old Norse neyte, neyti (use), from Proto-Germanic *nautiz (use).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

nait (plural naits)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Use; profit; foredeal; advantage.
  2. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Use; end; purpose.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English nait, nayt, from Old Norse neytr (in good order, fit, fit for use), from Proto-Germanic *nautiz (useful, helpful). Compare Old English nyttol (useful).

Adjective[edit]

nait (comparative naiter or more nait, superlative naitest or most nait)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Useful; good at need; fit; able.
  2. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Quick and effective; deft; skilful.
  3. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) In good order; trim; tidy; dainty; clean.
Derived terms[edit]

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

nait

  1. Second-person singular indicative present form of naida.
  2. Second-person singular indicative past form of naida.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

nait

  1. third-person singular present indicative of naitre

Anagrams[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English night

Noun[edit]

nait

  1. night
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:5 (translation here):
      Tulait em i kolim “De,” na tudak em i kolim “Nait.” Nait i go pinis na moning i kamap. Em i de namba wan.
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