&c.

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

A use of the ligature & to stand for the et in etc. Compare & cetera.

Phrase[edit]

&c.

  1. (dated) Alternative form of etc.: …and so on, …and other things.
    • 1612, George Wither, Epithalamia, Or Nuptiall Poems Upon the Most Blessed and Happie Mariage Betweene the High and Mightie Prince Frederick the Fifth, Count Palatine of the Rhein, &c., and Princesse Elizabeth, Sole Daughter to Iames, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britaine, France and Ireland
    • 1739, W. (William) Webster, Remarks on The Divine Legation of Moses, &c. in Several Letters - If I had not done amongst them the Works that no other Man did, they had not had Sin, &c. John 15:24
    • 1854, George Boole, “Signs and their Laws”, in An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, on which are Founded the Mathematical Theories of Logic and Probabilities[1], London: Walton and Maberly, page 37:
      Let us conceive, then, of an Algebra in which the symbols x, y, z, &c. admit indifferently of the values 0 and 1, and of these values alone.
    • 1902, William Paton Buchan, Plumbing: A Text-book to the Practice of the Art Or Craft of the Plumber - Where a Geyser or hot-water heater is used it is a good and wise precaution to see that the bath-room, &c., when it is used is well ventilated.
    • 1977, K. P. Punnoose, Bookdealers in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka &c.

French[edit]

Adverb[edit]

&c.

  1. Archaic form of etc.

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Formed by replacing the Latin et (and) with &.

Adverb[edit]

&c.

  1. Archaic form of etc.

Spanish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

&c.

  1. Obsolete form of etc.