Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/sek-

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This Proto-Indo-European entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Indo-European[edit]

Alternative reconstructions[edit]

Root[edit]

*sek-[4]

  1. to cut, cut off, sever

Derived terms[edit]


  • *sḗk-ti ~ *sék-n̥ti (root present)[1]
    • Balto-Slavic: *sektei[5]
      • Slavic: *sěťi (to cut) (see there for further descendants)
  • *sek-eh₂-yé-ti[6] or *sek-h₁-yé-ti[1][2]
  • *skéy-ti (*éy-present) (see there for further descendants)
  • *sék-no-m[4]
  • Indo-European: *sēk-teh₂-}[4][6]
    • Albanian: shat (hoe, mattock)
  • *sék-tleh₂[4]
    • Italic: [Term?]
      • Latin: secula (see there for further descendants)
  • *sek-ūr-
    • Balto-Slavic: [Term?]
      • Slavic: *sekyra (axe)[4] (see there for further descendants)
    • Italic: [Term?]
      • Latin: secūris (see there for further descendants)
  • *sek-yeh₂-[8]
  • *sek-yó-m[4][8]
    • Germanic: *segją (hard skin)[8]
      • Old Norse: sigg (see there for further descendants)
  • *sok-éh₂[6]
    • Germanic: *sagō[6] (see there for further descendants)
  • *h₁en-sek-[4][6]
*sek-s-
Unsorted formations
  • Latin: sacēna
  • (possibly) Germanic: *seglą (see there for further descendants)

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*sekH-¹”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, →ISBN, page 524
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page secō, -āre of 550-551
  3. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page sĕk- of 895-896
  5. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “įsėkti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 205
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sagō-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 421
  7. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 563
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*segja-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 430
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*sex-skā/ī-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 331
  10. 10.0 10.1 Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sahsa-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 421