Elysian

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See also: elysian

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sebastiaen Vrancx, L’Elysée ou Enée retrouvant son père aux Champs Elysées (The Elysium, or Aeneas Finding His Father at the Elysian Fields, between 1597 and 1607), from the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon in Lyon, France. It depicts a scene from Virgil’s Aeneid where Aeneas meets his father Anchises in Elysium.

From Latin Elysium (from Ancient Greek Ἠλύσιον (Ēlúsion, Elysium; an Elysian Field; one of the Elysian Fields)) +‎ -an (suffix creating an adjective).

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Proper noun[edit]

Elysian

  1. (Greek mythology) Elysium (the home of the blessed after death).

Adjective[edit]

Elysian (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to Elysian or Elysium, the location.
    • 1826, John Frederick Dennett, “The Second Voyage of Captain Parry”, in The Voyages and Travels of Captains Parry, Franklin, Ross, and Mr. Belzoni; Forming an Interesting History of the Manners, Customs, and Characters of Various Nations, Visited by Enterprising Travellers, London: Published by J. Jacques and W. Wright, 13, Paternoster Row, OCLC 937425395, page 246:
      Departed spirits do not however make a joyful and immediate entrance into these elysian fields, but must first slide for the space of five days, or, according to others, for a still longer period, down a rough rock, which the Greenlanders, by a strange contradiction, represent to be quite bloody.
    • 1897, Alexander Henry; David Thompson, “Ethnography of Fort Vermilion”, in Elliott Coues, editor, New Light on the Early History of the Greater Northwest: The Manuscript Journals of Alexander Henry, Fur Trader of the Northwest Company and of David Thompson, Official Geographer of the Same Company 1799–1814: Exploration and Adventure among the Indians on the Red, Saskatchewan, Missouri and Columbia Rivers [...] In Three Volumes, volume II, New York, N.Y.: Francis P. Harper, OCLC 421568505, part II (The Saskatchewan and Columbia Rivers), page 529:
      But everyone that has lived a wicked life on earth, committed murder in his own nation, or been guilty of suicide, must pass by a different route to the Elysian fields. He has a steep precipice to climb, which gives him much pain and trouble; []
  2. (idiomatic) Blissful, happy, heavenly.

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