Luftwaffe

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English[edit]

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 Luftwaffe on Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From German Luftwaffe (literally air-weapon).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlʊftvafə/, /ˈlʊftwɑfə/

Proper noun[edit]

Luftwaffe

  1. (military) The German air force, especially during the Second World War.
    • 2020 April 19, Neal Ascherson, “After the crisis, a new world won’t emerge as if by magic. We will have to fight for it”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Politicians insist that lockdown under coronavirus is like the experience of wartime. It’s not – except in one way, which I’ll come to. It’s so quiet, for one thing. War is noisy. Sirens, soldiers tramping past singing, Luftwaffe engines in the night sky.
    • 2021 September 8, Dr Joseph Brennan, “Electric tramways at the heart of our seaside story”, in RAIL, number 939, page 57:
      Owing to its location at the entrance to the River Tyne, South Shields was of strategic importance in the Second World War, especially to the merchant navy, and the town was heavily hit by a Luftwaffe strike in October 1941.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Luft (air) +‎ Waffe (weapon).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlʊftˌvafə/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Luftwaffe f (genitive Luftwaffe, plural Luftwaffen)

  1. airforce
    Synonyms: Luftstreitkräfte, Luftstreitmacht
    Die amerikanische Luftwaffe teilte mit, sie habe bei dem Angriff mehrere militärische sowie geheimdienstliche Ziele zerstört.
    The U.S. airforce informed that it had destroyed several military as well as intelligence targets in the strike.

Declension[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Luftwaffe f (proper noun, genitive Luftwaffe)

  1. (historical) The airforce of the Third Reich.
  2. The airforce of the Federal Republic of Germany.
  3. The airforce of Switzerland.

Usage notes[edit]

Further reading[edit]