Talk:scat

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scat[edit]

Coprophilia? Dmcdevit·t 20:21, 12 April 2008 (UTC)

Yes. It's metonymy, from a shortening of scatological or some such. —RuakhTALK 20:46, 12 April 2008 (UTC)
It's disgusting, but it's true. Some people are into this type of sh_t.--Dmol 21:02, 12 April 2008 (UTC)
Well, I wasn't disputing that the concept of coprophilia exists, or that some people are into it(!). But an anonymous editor added a slang for it that I hadn't heard of, so I thought I'd bring it here for more eyes. Dmcdevit·t 02:57, 13 April 2008 (UTC)
Cites are available [1] Have fun. Kappa 10:21, 14 April 2008 (UTC)
Dmcdevit - don't worry, I have never heard of "Coprophilia" before, I've always known it as SCAT...--BigBadBen 15:27, 14 April 2008 (UTC)

See [2], and even (WARNING: those who are squeamish would be advised not to visit what follows, nor should minors nor those who live in jurisdictions where downloading such images may be illegal) google.com/images?safe=off&q=scat --124.19.0.118 12:45, 20 April 2008 (UTC)

Cited.RuakhTALK 20:58, 17 May 2009 (UTC)

Etymology 2[edit]

The Old English form scear is certainly from Proto-Germanic *skarną, akin to Greek σχωρ, but Old English SCĀT would certainly not be a derivation form σκατός the genetive of σχωρ. Middle English SCAT is apparently an abbreviation of scatter which through its gradations is from Proto-Indo-European *sḱeyd-, *skeyd- (to split, divide, separate); but not related to Middle English shat as past participle of scite, except ultimately from the P.I.E. root. Andrew H. Gray 19:00, 11 August 2017 (UTC)Andrew (talk)

Alternate ety for rain shower?[edit]

Chambers 1908 suggests this is "probably connected with scud". Equinox 03:34, 6 December 2017 (UTC)

requested quote from Wright[edit]

I have removed the template requesting a quotation from Wright. I assume the request was added due to this from Webster 1913:

  • Scat, n. A shower of rain. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.

However, Wright is a dictionary, and therefore not really suitable as a usage example.

  • 1898, Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary[3], volume V, page 246:
    SCAT. sb. Dev. Cor. [skæt] A spell of weather, a bout, turn.

Cnilep (talk) 01:39, 14 September 2018 (UTC)