ataxia

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἀταξία (ataxía, disorder), derived from ἄτακτος (átaktos, disorderly).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈtæksɪə/, /eɪˈtæksɪə/
  • Hyphenation: atax‧ia

Noun[edit]

ataxia (countable and uncountable, plural ataxias)

  1. (pathology) Lack of coordination while performing voluntary movements, which may appear to be clumsiness, inaccuracy, or instability.
    Synonyms: ataxy, dystaxia (rare)
  2. (chemistry) The condition of a polymer in which the orientation of the subunits is random
  3. (obsolete) Disorder; irregularity.
    Synonym: dystaxia (obsolete)
    • 1569, John Leslie, A Defence of the Honour of the Right Highe, Mightye and Noble Princesse Marie Quene of Scotlande, Rheims, Book 3,[1]
      Ye frame an other argumente of inconueniences, as thowghe vnder the womans regimente, Ataxia, that ys to saye disorder moste commonlye creapethe in.
    • 1614, Thomas Adams, The Devills Banket, London: Ralph Mab, The Second Service, Sermon{{nbsp}]2, p. 51,[2]
      Let not Gods eutaxie, Order, by our friuolous scruples be brought to ataxie, Confusion.
    • 1640, Joseph Hall, Episcopacie by Divine Right, London: Nathanael Butter, Part 3, § 1, p. 212,[3]
      Neither is there any Ataxie to bee feared in bringing in this distinction, betwixt Pastors and flock; It is an Eutaxie rather:

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Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ataxia f (plural ataxias)

  1. (pathology) ataxia (pathological lack of coordination)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ataxia” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ataxia f (plural -)

  1. (pathology) ataxia

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]