badinage

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French badinage, from the verb badiner ‎(to jest, joke), from Provençal. Distantly related to abash.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

badinage ‎(countable and uncountable, plural badinages)

  1. Playful raillery; banter.
    • 1882, W. S. Gilbert, Iolanthe, Act I, [1]
      Your badinage so airy, / Your manner arbitrary, / Are out of place / When face to face / With an influential Fairy.
    • 1893, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, The Jew, translated by Linda Da Kowalewska, London: Heinemann, Chapter XIII, p. 254, [2]
      " [] God knows that if you were only safely married to Jacob I would not care how much you saw of Henri; but as you are not, I think these badinages are very ill-timed and take your mind off the principal business."
    • 1933, George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London, Chapter XXXII, [3]
      [] take the word 'barnshoot'—a corruption of the Hindustani word bahinchut. A vile and unforgivable insult in India, this word is a piece of gentle badinage in England.
    • 1994, Lawrence G. DiTillio, Babylon 5, "Spider in the Web", 13m 19s
      [Talia:] You'll forgive me if I'm not in the mood for your usual badinage.
    • 2005, The Times (London), October 31
      "No, this was more a night of bellowed barbed badinage, boisterous BS, outrageous declamations and defiant roars."
    • 2007, Alessandro Bertolotti, Books of Nudes, Abrams, p. 92, [4]
      Described at the time as "photographic badinages" the photographs in Die Erotik in der Photographie include one of a nude model stretched out languidly on a bearskin []

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

badinage ‎(third-person singular simple present badinages, present participle badinaging, simple past and past participle badinaged)

  1. To engage in badinage or playful banter.

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

badin +‎ -age

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

badinage m ‎(plural badinages)

  1. joke; gag; wind-up
  2. (figuratively) a trivial, simple task