bakra

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Garo[edit]

Noun[edit]

bakra

  1. wilderness

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

bak +‎ -ra

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɒkrɒ]
  • Hyphenation: bak‧ra

Noun[edit]

bakra

  1. sublative singular of bak

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Efik mbakara[1] or Ibibio mbakara. Compare Belizean Creole bakra, Jamaican Creole backra, Nicaraguan Creole bakra, Guyanese Creole English bakra, Saramaccan bakaa, English buckra and Gullah buckra.

Noun[edit]

bakra

  1. white person
    • 1757, minutes of the interrogation of Avontuur, quoted in: 2000, Margot C. van den Berg, "Mi no sal tron tongo". Early Sranan in court records 1667 - 1767, unpublished MA thesis, page 51:
      evie mi massra ben sendie mi go na Tampatie dan mie sa ben Soria dem Backara
      If my master had sent me to go to Tempatie, then I would have shown the Whites
    • 1858 May 16, W.E.H. Winkels, “Humoristische Snippertjes. (Uit de Portefeuille van den ouden Heer Furet.) XXXVI. DE WAARHEID op reis binnen de Kolonie Suriname. DE BLANKOFFICIER. [Humorous Snippets. (From the portfolio of the old Mr. Furet.) XXXVI. THE TRUTH travelling within the Colony of Surinam. THE PLANTATION OVERSEER]”, in Surinaamsch weekblad, Paramaribo: A.L.G. de Randamie, page 3:
      Poti! fa mi habi sari na ini mi hatti, foe so wan moi pikien bakra.!
      Oh! How I have pity in my heart for such a handsome young white [man]!
  2. Dutch person
  3. high-ranking official or civil servant

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: bakra

Adjective[edit]

bakra

  1. relating to a white person
    • 1840 July 17, Algemeen Handelsblad (classified advertisement), Amsterdam, page 3:
      Massera Ningre! condere draay, poespoessie jan sra, bakra oeman aksie man.
      Black gentlemen! The country changes, a cat eats lettuce, a white woman requests a man. (The grammatical number of the nouns is ambiguous)
  2. Dutch

References[edit]

  1. ^ Norval Smith, “Ingredient X: The shared African lexical element in the English-lexifier Atlantic Creoles, and the theory of rapid creolization”, in P. Muysken, N. Smith, editors, Surviving the Middle Passage: The West Africa-Surinam Sprachbund, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton, 2015, →ISBN, page 70