bern

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See also: Bern

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English bearn, contracted forms of Old English berern, bereærn (barn, granary). Equivalent to bere +‎ -ern.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛrn/, /ˈbɛːrn/

Noun[edit]

bern (plural bernes)

  1. barn, farm building, granary
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Matheu 3:12, page 2r, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      whos wynewing cloþ is in his hond .· ⁊ he ſchal fulli clenſe his coꝛn flooꝛ / and he ſchal gadere his wheete in to his berne .· but þe chaf he ſchal bꝛenne wiþ fier þat mai not be quenchid
      His winnowing fan is in his hand; he'll fully clean his threshing-floor, he'll gather up his wheat into his barn, and he'll burn the chaff with unquenchable fire.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: barn
  • Scots: bern
  • Yola: barrn
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bern

  1. Alternative form of barn (child)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

bern

  1. Alternative form of berne (knight)

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bern, from Old English bereærn.

Noun[edit]

bern (plural berns)

  1. barn

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian bern, barn, from Proto-West Germanic *barn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bern n (plural bern, diminutive berntsje)

  1. child, children

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bern (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011