blasé

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See also: blase, blasa, Blase, and blåse

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French blasé (blasé, jaded), past participle of blaser (to blunt, dull), perhaps from Middle Dutch blasen (to blow; to brag), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to blow; to bleat, cry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blasé (comparative more blasé, superlative most blasé)

  1. Unimpressed with something because of over-familiarity.
    Synonyms: casual, indifferent, jaded, nonchalant, unimpressed
    • 1847, Eugène Sue, “Lumineau”, in Martin the Foundling; or, The Memoirs of a Valet de Chambre, New York, N.Y.: William H. Colyer, [], OCLC 2415434, page 21, column 1:
      "Are people who are blasé ever in love? Just see how badly you play your part!" said Madame Wilson, laughingly; [] "Let us now speak seriously, my dear Scipion; yes, I believe you to be blasé—but blasé as regards all false pleasures, all deceptive enjoyments. []"
    • 1860 May, [David Masson], “Three Vices of Current Literature”, in David Masson, editor, Macmillan’s Magazine, volume II, number 7, Cambridge: Macmillan and Co. [], OCLC 804725154, page 11, column 2:
      It is the habit of heartlessly pecking at these that shows a soul that is blasé. Of late, for example, it has been a fashion with a small minority of British writers to assert their culture by a very supercilious demeanour towards an idea which ought, beyond all others, to be sacred in this island—the idea of Liberty.
    • 1913, G[eorge] R[obert] S[towe] Mead, “[Hans] Vaihinger’s Philosophy of the ‘As If’”, in Quests Old and New, London: G[eorge] Bell & Sons, Ltd., OCLC 561770246, page 249:
      [A] blasé age like our own that is familiar with pragmatism and radical empiricism, that has survived the wild castigations of a Nietzsche in the domain of morals and is popularly pleased rather than otherwise with a Bergson's pillorying of the intellect on a charge of false pretences to the power of comprehending life, is incapable of such excitement.
    • 1997, Joan German-Grapes, “The Elements of Job Success”, in The Teller’s Handbook: Everything a Teller Needs to Know to Succeed, 6th edition, New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, →ISBN, part 1 (“Bankability” Basics—The Teller as a Person), page 10:
      Often, it's considered "cool" to be blasé about almost everything by some unfortunate people and very "square" to be enthusiastic, especially about something as basic as a job. Fortunately, successful people are too busy being enthusiastic about their work to pay any attention.
    • 2007, Chris Rojek, “Georg Simmel”, in Tim Edwards, editor, Cultural Theory, London; Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE Publications, →ISBN, page 44:
      The blasé personality develops such an acute consciousness of being assailed by form that it develops a defence mechanism of indifference. Nothing surprises or enchants it. It is not moved by tragedy or triumph, but maintains an even keel in the face of all new sensory data and information. The blasé personality is really a form of social retreatism, since it is predicated on disengaging with the variety and diversity of exchange and interaction.

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Past participle of blaser

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blasé (feminine singular blasée, masculine plural blasés, feminine plural blasées)

  1. blasé, jaded

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blasé (invariable)

  1. blasé

Synonyms[edit]