breid

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: bréid

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German breit, from Old High German breit, from Proto-West Germanic *braid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

breid (comparative breider, superlative breidest)

  1. broad, wide
    De Schrank is zweu Meter breid.
    The closet is two meters wide.

Declension[edit]

Declension of breid
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative breid breid breid breide
accusative breide breid breid breide
dative breide breide breide breide
Strong inflection nominative breider breide breides breide
accusative breide breide breides breide
dative breidem breider breidem breide

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a conflation of Old English brægd, Old English gebregd, and Old Norse bragð; influenced by breiden.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrɛi̯d(ə)/, /ˈbreːd(ə)/

Noun[edit]

breid (plural breides)

  1. An action done passionately and impulsively:
    1. A hasty movement; especially without forewarning.
    2. An quickly-made and ill-thought action or decision.
    3. A passionate or heartfelt cry or protest.
  2. An action of conflict; assailment or attack:
    1. A physical attack; a strike with a weapon.
    2. An injury or torture; something that wounds.
  3. A scheme, gamble or swindle.
  4. An instant; a small amount of time.
  5. (rare) A beginning or initial phase.
  6. (rare) A strange event or occurrence.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: braid
  • Scots: braid
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

breid

  1. Alternative form of bred (bread)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

breid (masculine and feminine breid, neuter breidt, definite singular and plural breide, comparative breidare, indefinite superlative breidast, definite superlative breidaste)

  1. (pre-1917) alternative form of brei

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bred, from Old English bread, from Proto-Germanic *braudą.

Noun[edit]

breid (uncountable)

  1. bread