brid

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See also: bríd and Bríd

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English bridd, of disputed origin.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brid (plural briddes)

  1. a young bird, a bird in general
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Matheu 13:31-32, page 6v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      An oþer parable iheſus puttide foꝛþ to hem. / ⁊ ſeide / þe kyngdom of heuenes is lijk to a coꝛn of ſeneuey · which a man took ⁊ ſewe in his feeld · / which is þe leeſt of alle ſeedis / but whanne it haþ woxen .· it is the mooſt of alle woꝛtis · ⁊ is maad a tre / ſo þe bꝛiddis of þe eir comen ⁊ dwellen in þe bowis þerof.
      Jesus put another parable forwards to them, saying: "The Kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed that a person took and sowed in their field; / it is the smallest of all seeds, but when it has grown, it is the largest of all plants; it becomes a tree, so the birds of the air come and nest in its branches."
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: bird
  • Scots: bird
  • Yola: burdès (plural)
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

brid

  1. Alternative form of bride (bride)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

brid

  1. Alternative form of bred (bread)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

brȋd m (Cyrillic spelling бри̑д)

  1. (graph theory) edge

Further reading[edit]

  • brid” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Sudovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European [Term?]. Compare Lithuanian bríedis (elk, moose), Latvian briêdis (deer, stag; (originally) elk), Old Prussian braydis (elk).[1][2]

Noun[edit]

brid

  1. (zoology) deer, stag

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zigmas Zinkevičius (1985), “Lenkų-jotvingių žodynėlis? [A Polish-Yotvingian dictionary?]”, in Baltistica (in Lithuanian), volume 21, issue 1, page 70: “brid ‘elnias, l. jełen’ 26.”
  2. ^ bríedis” in Hock et al., Altlitauisches etymologisches Wörterbuch 2.0 (online, 2020–): “nar. s. brid Hirsch”.