brusque

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Brusque and brusqué

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French brusque, from Italian brusco (rude, sharp, sour); origin unknown.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɹuːsk/, /bɹʊsk/, /bɹʌsk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɹʌsk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌsk

Adjective[edit]

brusque (comparative brusquer or more brusque, superlative brusquest or most brusque)

  1. Rudely abrupt, unfriendly.
    • 1858, Anthony Trollope, Dr Thorne, ch. 3:
      He was brusque, authoritative, given to contradiction, rough though never dirty in his personal belongings, and inclined to indulge in a sort of quiet raillery.
    • 2019 April 28, Alex McLevy, “Game Of Thrones suffers the fog of war in the battle against the dead (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      When Dany showed up to throw the Night King off his steed and send him plunging to earth, it was at least a coherent action, which the brusque dragon-grappling prior to it failed to convey.

Quotations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian brusco.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brusque (plural brusques)

  1. abrupt (sudden or hasty)
    Synonyms: abrupt, brutal
  2. curt

Verb[edit]

brusque

  1. first-person singular present indicative of brusquer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of brusquer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of brusquer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of brusquer
  5. second-person singular imperative of brusquer

Further reading[edit]