cambra

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See also: Cambra

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin camera.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cambra f (plural cambres)

  1. room
  2. bedroom
  3. chamber

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

cambra

  1. third-person singular past historic of cambrer

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *krampō (cramp). Cognate with Portuguese cãibra and Spanish calambre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cambra m (plural cambras)

  1. cramp (a painful contraction of a muscle which cannot be controlled)
    Synonyms: breca

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cambra” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • cambra” in Santamarina, Antón (coord.): Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/TILG/>
  • cambra” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/Tesouro>



Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French cambre, derived from Latin camur (curved, bent).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkam.bra/, [ˈkämbr̺ä]
  • Stress: càmbra
  • Hyphenation: cam‧bra

Noun[edit]

cambra f (plural cambre)

  1. cramp, clamp

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cambra f (genitive cambrae); first declension

  1. medieval spelling of camera

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cambra cambrae
genitive cambrae cambrārum
dative cambrae cambrīs
accusative cambram cambrās
ablative cambrā cambrīs
vocative cambra cambrae

References[edit]

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cambra”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “cambra”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (in Latin), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 118/1

Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin camera. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French chambre.

Noun[edit]

cambra f (oblique plural cambras, nominative singular cambra, nominative plural cambras)

  1. room, in particular a bedroom

References[edit]