casus belli

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin casus (case) + belli (of war).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeɪsəs ˈbɛlaɪ/, IPA(key): /ˈkeɪsəs ˈbɛli/

Noun[edit]

casus belli (plural casus belli or casus bellis)

  1. An act seen as justifying or causing a war.
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York Review Books 2006, p. 309:
      Algiers seethed, and this was the casus belli for the ‘ultras’ to attempt a general strike.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 138:
      Furthermore, if the French had airily waved away one potential casus belli, more than enough causes of potential conflict remained embedded in the Aix-la-Chapelle Treaty.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 290:
      Had Saddam taken only the Rumaila oil field and the Bubiyan and Warba islands, there would have been no casus belli.

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

casus belli m (invariable)

  1. casus belli