coronel

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See also: Coronel

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coronel (plural coronels)

  1. Alternative form of cronel
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons
      The following description of the coronels or coronets, is given by Guillim in his display of heraldry

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

coronel (plural coronels)

  1. Obsolete form of colonel.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, A Vewe of the Present State of Ireland:
      Whereupon the said coronel did absolutely yield himself and the fort, with all therein, and craved only mercy, which it being not thought good to show them, both for danger of themselves, if being saved, they should afterwards join with the Irish, and also for terror to the Irish, who were much emboldened by those foreign succours, and also put in hope of more ere long;

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “coronel” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian colonnello, diminutive of colonna, from Latin columna.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coronel m (plural coronels)

  1. colonel

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

coronel m (plural coroneis, feminine coronela, feminine plural coronelas)

  1. colonel

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

coronel m (plural coronels)

  1. (Jersey) colonel

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French coronel, from Italian colonnello (the officer of a small company of soldiers (column) that marched at the head of a regiment), from compagnia colonnella (little column company), from Latin columna (pillar), from columen, contraction culmen (a pillar, top, crown, summit), o-grade form from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (going around).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -ɛl, (Brazil) -ɛw
  • Hyphenation: co‧ro‧nel

Noun[edit]

coronel m (plural coronéis, feminine coronela, feminine plural coronelas)

  1. colonel (commissioned office in the armed services)
  2. (Brazil) a politician in rural areas

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Kadiwéu: goloneegi

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Middle French colonel, from Italian colonnello, or alternatively from Old Occitan coronel, from a diminutive of Latin columna, becoming influenced by corona.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /koɾoˈnel/, [ko.ɾoˈnel]
  • Hyphenation: co‧ro‧nel
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

coronel m (plural coroneles, feminine coronela, feminine plural coronelas)

  1. colonel

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]