dass

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See also: daß

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare dare, darest, dast.

Verb[edit]

dass ‎(third-person singular simple present dasses, present participle dassing, simple past and past participle dassed)

  1. (archaic) To dare.
    • 1890, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Timothy's Quest, page 58:
      We all looked at one 'nother, 'n' I thought for a second somebody 'd laugh, but nobody dassed, 'n' there warn'ta sound in the room 's Aunt Beccy sot down agin' without movin' a muscle in her face.
    • 1904, Henry A. Shute, Sequil Or Things Whitch Aint Finished in the First, page 8:
      Gim scrached a line in the dirt and told Will not to dass to step over it and then Will put a chip on his sholeder and told Gim not to dass to nock it off
    • 1907, Lawrence Mott, To the credit of the sea, page 72:
      "Ay, an' lost me th' ship, 'cause I'd never dassed take her wi' only twenty barrel o' bait, 'f I'd knowed th' new law. I hain't got much money, Mr. Burberry, an' there's the missils an' kiddies to house an' dress an' feed.
    • 1907, Mabel Osgood Wright, Gray lady and the birds: stories of the bird year for home and school, page 41:
      You weren't smart to refuse; you could have had a peep inside the General's house, maybe, and I don't believe she'd dassed said a word about birds on hats, with one of the company wearing 'em!
    • 1933, Sammy Lerner, theme from Popeye the Sailor:
      "If anyone dasses to risk my fist, it's Boff! and it's Wham! Understand?"

See also[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • daß (older spelling)
  • dat (nonstandard, colloquial, dialectal)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German daz, from Proto-Germanic *þat. Compare Dutch dat, English that. Distinction from das is purely orthographical convention.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

dass

  1. (subordinating) that
    Ich habe gehört, dass du krank bist.
    I was told that you were sick.
  2. (subordinating, chiefly colloquial) so that
    Beeil dich, dass wir bald losfahren können.
    Hurry up so that we can take off soon.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The acceptability and use of dass and daß has varied over the centuries; daß was the more common form until about 1871, when dass became more common and remained so until it was deprecated in 1902 following the Second Orthographic Conference. (In Württemberg, Saxony and Prussia it had been deprecated earlier in the 19th century.[1][2][3]) Thereafter, daß was again the most common form until it was deprecated and dass was revived by the 1996 Rechtschreibreform.[4]

Synonyms[edit]

  • (so that): damit (standard usage)

External links[edit]

  • dass in Duden online
  1. ^ Regeln und Wörterverzeichniß für die deutsche Rechtschreibung, zum Gebrauch in den württembergischen Schulanstalten amtlich festgestellt (Stuttgart, Verlag der J. B. Metzlerschen Buchhandlung, 1861), page 12f.
  2. ^ Regeln und Wörterverzeichnis für die deutsche Rechtschreibung zum Gebrauch in den sächsischen Schulen. Im Auftrage des Königl. Ministeriums des Kultus und öffentlichen Unterrichts herausgegeben. (Generalverordnung vom 9. Oktober 1880.) (Dresden, Verlag von Alwin Huhle (Carl Adlers Buchhandlung), 1880), page 8f.
  3. ^ Regeln und Wörterverzeichnis für die deutsche Rechtschreibung zum Gebrauch in den preußischen Schulen. Herausgegeben im Auftrage des Königlichen Ministeriums der geistlichen, Unterrichts- und Medizinal-Angelegenheiten (Zweiter Neudruck. Berlin, Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1883; Zweiter Neudruck. Neu durchgesehen. Berlin, Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1887), page 8f.
  4. ^ Google Books Ngram data

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

dass

  1. Alternative form of datt

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German das Haus or Häuschen ("The (little) house", euphemistically omitting the main word (out)house).

Noun[edit]

dass

  1. (colloquial) toilet, crapper
  2. (pejorative) a jerk
    Din dass!
    You jerk!

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Compounds[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of German “das Haus” (the house)

Noun[edit]

dass n

  1. (colloquial) a toilet, an outhouse; in particular used about toilets outdoors

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]