daunt

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English daunten, from Old French danter, from Latin domitō (tame, verb), frequentative of Latin domō (tame, conquer, verb), from Proto-Indo-European *demh₂- (to domesticate, tame). Doublet of dompt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

daunt (third-person singular simple present daunts, present participle daunting, simple past and past participle daunted)

  1. (transitive) To discourage, intimidate.
    • 1912, Alexander Berkman, chapter 17, in Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist:
      No, I shall not disgrace the Cause, I shall not grieve my comrades by weak surrender! I will fight and struggle, and not be daunted by threat or torture.
    • 1913, Paul Laurence Dunbar, “A Lost Dream”, in The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar:
      Ah, I have changed, I do not know / Why lonely hours affect me so. / In days of yore, this were not wont, / No loneliness my soul could daunt.
  2. (transitive) To overwhelm.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

daunt

  1. Alternative form of daunten