dauphin

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See also: Dauphin and dauphîn

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French dauphin, from Old French dalphin, from Latin delphinus. Doublet of dolphin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dauphin (plural dauphins)

  1. The eldest son of the king of France. Under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties, the Dauphin of France, generally shortened to Dauphin, was heir apparent to the throne of France. The title derived from the main title of the Dauphin, Dauphin of Viennois.
  2. (allegorical): An eldest son.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      "I wish we were back in Tenth Street. But so many children came [] and the Tenth Street house wasn't half big enough; and a dreadful speculative builder built this house and persuaded Austin to buy it. Oh, dear, and here we are among the rich and great; and the steel kings and copper kings and oil kings and their heirs and dauphins. []"

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dauphin

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈdofɛːn]
  • Hyphenation: dau‧phin

Noun[edit]

dauphin m anim

  1. dauphin, the eldest son of the king of France and heir apparent to the French throne
    • 1913, Květy[1], volume 35, page 599:
      Malý dauphin jest nemocen, malý dauphin umře… Ve všech kostelích v království stále dnem i nocí jest vystavena svátost oltářní a veliké svíčky plají za uzdravení královského dítěte.
      The little dauphin is ill, the little dauphin is going to die… In all the churches in the kingdom the Eucharist is displayed day and night and big candles burn so that the royal child recovers.

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dauphin in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • dauphin in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /do.fɛ̃/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French dalphin, from Latin delphinus

Noun[edit]

dauphin m (plural dauphins)

  1. dolphin
  2. (heraldry) dolphin; the animal used as a charge

Etymology 2[edit]

From French proper name Dauphin through association with crown princes of the name, from French dauphin, from Old French dalphin, from Latin delphinus

Noun[edit]

dauphin m (plural dauphins, feminine dauphine)

  1. successor, dauphin
  2. runner-up
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French dauphin.

Noun[edit]

dauphin m (plural dauphins)

  1. (historical) dauphin (eldest son of the king of France)

Synonyms[edit]