throne

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Throne

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English trone, from Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος ‎(thrónos, chair, throne).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

throne ‎(plural thrones)

  1. An impressive seat used by a monarch, often on a raised dais in a throne room and reserved for formal occasions.
    He approached the throne reverently.
  2. (humorous) Other seats, particularly:
    1. (euphemistic) A seat used for urination or defecation, such as a chamber pot, toilet, or the seat of an outhouse.
      She's on the throne.
    2. (music) A kind of stool used by drummers.
  3. (figuratively) Leadership, particularly the position of a monarch.
    Elizabeth has sat upon the throne of England for six decades.
  4. (Christianity) An order of angels ranked above dominions and below cherubim.

Hypernyms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

throne ‎(third-person singular simple present thrones, present participle throning, simple past and past participle throned)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To place on a royal seat; to enthrone.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To place in an elevated position; to give sovereignty or dominion to; to exalt.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Milton
      True image of the Father, whether throned / In the bosom of bliss, and light of light.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To be in, or sit upon, a throne; to be placed as if upon a throne.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

throne

  1. vocative singular of thronus

References[edit]

  • throne in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French trone the h was added back to reflect the Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος ‎(thrónos, chair, throne).

Noun[edit]

throne m (plural thrones)

  1. throne

Descendants[edit]