throne

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See also: Throne

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English trone, from Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

throne (plural thrones)

  1. An impressive seat used by a monarch, often on a raised dais in a throne room and reserved for formal occasions.
    He approached the throne reverently.
    Queen Victoria sat upon the throne of England for 63 years.
    The prince's newborn baby is fifth in line to the throne.
  2. (figuratively) Leadership, particularly the position of a monarch.
  3. The seat of a bishop in the cathedral-church of his diocese; also, the seat of a pope.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 105:
      Pope Joan, who once occupied the throne of the Vatican, was reputed to be the blackest sorcerer of them all.
  4. (humorous) Other seats, particularly:
    1. (euphemistic) A seat used for urination or defecation, such as a chamber pot, toilet, or the seat of an outhouse.
      • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things
        "If she has intestinal flu, you probably called while she was on the throne and she didn't want to admit it," Alan said dryly.
    2. (music) A kind of stool used by drummers.
  5. (Christianity) A member of an order of angels ranked above dominions and below cherubim.

Synonyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

throne (third-person singular simple present thrones, present participle throning, simple past and past participle throned)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To place on a royal seat; to enthrone.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To place in an elevated position; to give sovereignty or dominion to; to exalt.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To be in, or sit upon, a throne; to be placed as if upon a throne.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

throne

  1. inflection of thronen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

throne

  1. vocative singular of thronus

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

throne

  1. Alternative form of trone (throne)

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos). The h was added back to reflect the Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

Noun[edit]

throne m (plural thrones)

  1. throne

Descendants[edit]

  • French: trône