dotage

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

dote +‎ -age, from Middle English doten (to dote).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dotage (countable and uncountable, plural dotages)

  1. Decline in judgment and other cognitive functions, associated with aging; senility.
    • 1841, Charles Dickens, chapter 1, in The Old Curiosity Shop:
      "More care!" said the old man. [] There were in his face marks of deep and anxious thought which convinced me that he could not be, as I had been at first inclined to suppose, in a state of dotage or imbecility.
  2. Fondness or attentiveness, especially to an excessive degree.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, scene 3,
      CLAUDIO: And she is exceeding wise.
      DON PEDRO: In every thing but in loving Benedick. [] I would she had bestowed this dotage on me.
  3. Foolish utterance(s); drivel.
    • Milton
      the sapless dotages of old Paris and Salamanca

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From doten +‎ -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔːtaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun[edit]

dotage (uncountable) (Late ME)

  1. Behaviour that is stupid or ill-advised; ridiculousness or insanity:
    1. Ill-thought or fatuitous love or romantic feelings.
    2. Weakening of the mind due to age; dotage.
  2. Disintegration, rotting, or collapsing.

Descendants[edit]

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