drivel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɹɪv.əl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪvəl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English drivelen, drevelen, from Old English dreflian (to drivel, slobber, slaver), from Proto-Germanic *drablijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerebʰ- (cloudy, turbid; yeast).

Noun[edit]

drivel (countable and uncountable, plural drivels)

  1. senseless talk; nonsense
  2. saliva, drool
  3. (obsolete) A fool; an idiot.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Philip Sidney to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

drivel (third-person singular simple present drivels, present participle (US) driveling or drivelling, simple past and past participle (US) driveled or drivelled)

  1. To have saliva drip from the mouth; to drool.
  2. To talk nonsense; to talk senselessly.
  3. To be weak or foolish; to dote.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Old Dutch drevel, "a scullion".

Noun[edit]

drivel (plural drivels)

  1. (obsolete) A servant; a drudge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Huloet to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]