equitable

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: équitable

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French équitable, from Old French, from equité (equity).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.wɪ.tə.bəl/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

equitable (comparative more equitable, superlative most equitable)

  1. Marked by or having equity.
  2. Fair, just, or impartial.
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral, London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 33.
      I may justly require you to produce that argument; nor have you any pretence to refuse so equitable a demand.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 254:
      Security can be obtained but by defined rights, and these can be ensured only by equitable laws.
  3. (law) Relating to the general principles of justice that correct or supplement the provisions of the law.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

equitable m or f (plural equitables)

  1. equitable (fair, just, even, balanced)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: équitable