exception that proves the rule

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from the medieval Latin legal principle "exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis" ("the exception tests the rule in the cases not excepted").

Examples
  • "Entry is free on Sundays."
    - This implies that entry is not free on the other six days of the week.
  • "Parking prohibited on Sundays."
    - This implies that parking is not prohibited on the other six days of the week.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

exception that proves the rule (plural exceptions that prove the rule or exceptions that prove rules)

  1. The rare occurrence of a counterexample to a rule, used to demonstrate that the rule exists.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]