façade

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See also: facade

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

façade (plural façades)

  1. Alternative form of facade.
    • 1941 August, C. Hamilton Ellis, “The English Station”, in Railway Magazine, page 358:
      If Euston is not typically English, St. Pancras is. Its façade is a nightmare of improbable Gothic. It is fairly plastered with the aesthetic ideals of 1868, and the only beautiful thing about it is Barlow's roof. It is haunted by the stuffier kind of ghost. Yet there is something about the ordered whole of St. Pancras that would make demolition a terrible pity.
    • 2019, Bernardine Evaristo, Girl, Woman, Other, Penguin Books (2020), page 291:
      he wanted to know who she was deep down inside, the real Penny behind the pleasant, people-pleasing façade, as was her fate as a woman and mother

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French façade, itself from Italian facciata.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

façade f (plural façades, diminutive façadetje n)

  1. façade (of a building)
  2. façade (deceptive outward appearance)
  3. (metonymy) face

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: fasade
  • Indonesian: fasade
  • West Frisian: fasade

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian facciata, a derivation of faccia (front), from Latin facies (face).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

façade f (plural façades)

  1. façade (of a building)
    L'entrée principale, au centre de la façade, est précédée d'un perron. (The main entrance, in the center of the façade, is preceded by a flight of steps.)
  2. façade (deceptive outward appearance)
    Je me charge de vous montrer Lisbonne. Une belle façade, oui! mais vous verrez ce qu'il y a derrière! (Simone de Beauvoir, Les Mandarins, 1954, p. 88)

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]