feraid

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish feraid, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to heed).[1]

Verb[edit]

feraid (conjunct ·fera, verbal noun ferthain)

  1. to grant
  2. to supply, to provide
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:
      Ro·ferad failte friu uile, ocus ructha chuci-sium isin mbruidin.
      They were all made welcome and brought to him in the hall.
      (literally, “A welcome was provided to them all…”)

Inflection[edit]

  • Passive singular perfect deuterotonic: ro·ferad

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: fear (to grant)

Mutation[edit]

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
feraid ḟeraid feraid
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pedersen, Holger (1913) Vergleichende Grammatik der keltischen Sprachen (in German), volume II, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, →ISBN, pages 517–18

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Pedersen connects it with Old High German (gi)werēn (modern German gewähren), which is from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to heed).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

feraid (conjunct ·fera)

  1. to grant
  2. to supply, to provide
    ferais fáilte friswelcomed him (literally, “provided a welcome to him”)
  3. to pour, to shower, to shed (precipitation)

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
feraid ḟeraid feraid
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pedersen, Holger (1913) Vergleichende Grammatik der keltischen Sprachen (in German), volume II, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, →ISBN, pages 517–18