foison

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French foison, from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem. Doublet of fusion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

foison (plural foisons)

  1. (archaic) An abundance, a rich supply of.
  2. (archaic) Harvest.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i], page 7:
      Gonzalo: [] Treaſon, fellony, / Sword, Pike, Knife, Gun, or neede of any Engine / Would I not haue : but Nature ſhould bring forth / Of it owne kinde, all foyzon, all abundance / To feed my innocent people.
  3. (chiefly Scotland) Strength, power.

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French foison, from Old French foison, inherited from Latin fūsiōnem, singular accusative of fūsiō. Doublet of fusion, a borrowing.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

foison f (uncountable)

  1. (dated) abundance, great deal, load
    J'ai foison de copines: I've got plenty of girlfriends.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French foison.

Noun[edit]

foison f (plural foisons)

  1. much; a lot of

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem.

Noun[edit]

foison f (oblique plural foisons, nominative singular foison, nominative plural foisons)

  1. much; a lot of

Descendants[edit]