gâche

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Norman gâche.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gâche (plural gâches)

  1. (Guernsey) A type of traditional fruitcake. (Often as Guernsey gâche.)
    • 1938, National Geographic, vol.LXXIII:
      A huge Guernsey gache, which is a sort of fruit cake, was flanked by plates and baskets of figs, grapes, nectarines, peaches, and raspberries.
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 48:
      She said I could go on the Sunday afternoon, and she would make a gâche I could take to him.
    • 1980, John McCormack, The Guernsey House:
      Baking of bread, gâche – a sort of fruit loaf rather like the Welsh bara brith – and Guernsey biscuits – a kind of bread bun – would be done once a week [...].
    • 2011, Sandra Clayton, Dolphins Under My Bed:
      It is too hot to eat much, so we lunch on bananas and the gache loaf bought the previous day, and set off for Guernsey at half past one.

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French gache (a mason's tool for mixing, spatula, trowel), from Old French gaiche (oar, rowing), derivative of gaschier (to wash, soak), from Old Frankish *waskan, *wascōn (to wask, bathe), from Proto-Germanic *waskaną (to wash). More at gâcher, wash.

Noun[edit]

gâche f (plural gâches)

  1. oar
  2. trowel

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French gache, from Old French gaiche, gasche (spike), from Old Frankish *gaspia (buckle, loop) for *gapsia, *gaupsia, probably allied to Proto-Germanic *gaupaz (crooked, bent apart), from Proto-Indo-European *gheub-, *gheubh- (to bend, bend over, move). Cognate with Dutch gesp, gespe (buckle, clasp, loop, hook), Low German gaspe, gespe, göspe (loop, hook), Old English gēap (bent, crooked, curved, open, wide, extensive). More at gap, gape, gaff.

Noun[edit]

gâche f (plural gâches)

  1. (mechanical, of a door) keeper, strike

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected forms.

Verb[edit]

gâche

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gâcher
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gâcher
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gâcher
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of gâcher
  5. second-person singular imperative of gâcher

Etymology 4[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

gâche f (plural gâches)

  1. (regional, Vendée) A type of local brioche flavoured with orange.
  2. (regional, Normandy, Brittany) A type of flat, rounded local bread

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

gâche f (plural gâches)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) cake
  2. (Guernsey) gâche
    • 2006, Peggy Collenette, ‘D'la gâche de Guernési’, P'tites Lures Guernésiaises, Cromwell Press 2006, p. 20:
      La vieille Louise était embarrassaïe à faire sa pâte pour sa gâche, et v'là daon aen tappe à l'hus.
      Old Louise was busy making her dough for her gâche, and there was a knock at the door.

Derived terms[edit]