goin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Goin, go in, and goin'

English[edit]

Verb[edit]

goin

  1. Pronunciation spelling of going.
    • 1870, Various, Punchinello, Vol. II., No. 34, November 19, 1870[1]:
      I see they was goin, so I said:-- "My week-minded and misgided femails, hold your hosses a minnit, until an old statesman, who has served his country for 4 yeer as Gustise of the Peece, says a few remarks to you."
    • 1905, George Bernard Shaw, The Irrational Knot[2]:
      Youre goin on fit to raise the street." "
    • 1994 April 29, Michael Dolan, “Nixon in Hell”, in Chicago Reader[3]:
      Now I got nothing goin on but a fockin ping-pong tournament with Kurt Cobain, who fockin cheats, man, like it's gonna do him any fockin good.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

goin

  1. Instructive plural form of go.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

goin f (genitive singular goine, nominative plural goine)

  1. bit, scrap
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Irish gonaid, from Old Irish gonaid, from Proto-Celtic *gʷaneti, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰen-.

Verb[edit]

goin (present analytic goineann, future analytic goinfidh, verbal noun goineadh, past participle gointe)

  1. wound, stab, sting, hurt
    Synonyms: cneáigh, créachtaigh, leon
  2. (literary) mortally wound, slay
  3. (card games) jink, win (a game) outright
Conjugation[edit]

Noun[edit]

goin f (genitive singular gona, nominative plural gonta)

  1. wound
    Synonyms: cneá, créacht
  2. stab, sting, hurt
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
goin ghoin ngoin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.