goudron

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French goudron (tar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

goudron (plural goudrons)

  1. Tar, especially boiled tar.
    • 1887, Institution of Civil Engineers of Ireland, Transactions, volume 17 page=213:
      The manner of laying down the asphalt is as follows : -A fire is first lighted under the boiler, then the goudron is put in.
    • 1900, Society of Chemical Industry (Great Britain), Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry, page 652:
      About 50 kilos of goudron from Romany oil were carefully cracked at about 400 °C., partly with steam an partly without. In the latter case, dark paraffin wax was obtained from the higher fractions, []
    • 1902, The Petroleum Review, with which is Incorporated "Petroleum", page 671:
      He is unable to select his crude, and often has to be satisfied with a worse residuum; nor is he in a position to dispose of his goudron as the latter, and for all these reasons, such a refinery is compelled to secure as high a ...
    • 1903, Great Britain. Patent Office, Patents for Inventions. Abridgments of Specifications, page 75:
      The carbon electrodes rest on a layer f of goudron, which is tar boiled or evaporated to a density greater than that of ordinary tar.
    • 1906, The Petroleum Review ..., page 156:
      In some parts the oil soaks through river alluvia and forms small goudron deposits.
    • 1909, Petroleum Review
      For this purpose, the goudrons are diluted with a certain quantity of water, so as to reduce the acid to 50 °B.; at the same time, the mass is energetically blown with air, in order to separate and to bring to the surface of the ...
    • 1923, Petroleum Times
      (6) Natural liquid goudrons are solutions of more or less oxidized (resinified) solid hydrocarbons in liquid hydrocarbons, and are therefore thick and viscous.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French goutren, from Old French catran, from Medieval Latin catarannus, from Arabic قَطْرَان(qaṭrān). Form influenced by Middle French goutte (see French goutte).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡu.dʁɔ̃/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

goudron m (plural goudrons)

  1. tar (substance)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]