gride

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a metathetic variation of gird (to strike, smite, upbraid, scold, jibe), from Middle English girden, gerden (to strike, thrust, smite, literally smite with a rod), from gerd, yerd (a rod, yard). More at yard.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹaɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Verb[edit]

gride (third-person singular simple present grides, present participle griding, simple past and past participle grided)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To pierce (something) with a weapon; to wound, to stab.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To travel through something, of a weapon or sharp object.
  3. To produce a grinding or scraping sound.
    • 1849, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam A.H.H., canto 108:
      Fiercely flies
      The blast of North and East, and ice
      Makes daggers at the sharpen’d eaves,
      And bristles all the brakes and thorns
      To yon hard crescent, as she hangs
      Above the wood which grides and clangs
      Its leafless ribs and iron horns
      Together, in the drifts that pass
      To darken on the rolling brine
      That breaks the coast.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

gride (plural grides)

  1. A harsh grating sound.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 160:
      The tumultuous noise resolved itself now into the disorderly mingling of many voices, the gride of many wheels, the creaking of waggons, and the staccato of hoofs.

Anagrams[edit]


Garo[edit]

Adverb[edit]

gride

  1. without