heretoga

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old English heretoga (army leader, commander, general)

Noun[edit]

heretoga (plural heretogas)

  1. (historical, Anglo-Saxon) An Anglo-Saxon army leader or commander; a general; a duke.
    • 1890, James Kendall Hosmer, A Short History of Anglo-Saxon Freedom:
      Like the old heretogas, they possessed no authority but such as was accorded them by their fellow-tribesmen, though when once constituted they had a power co-ordinate with that of the folk-moot.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

here (army) +‎ toga (leader). From Proto-Germanic *harjatugô (army leader), which contains Proto-Germanic *harjaz (army) and *tugô (leader) a derivation of Proto-Germanic *teuhaną.[1] Cognate to Old High German herizogo (German Herzog), Old Norse hertogi.

Noun[edit]

heretoga m

  1. duke

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), “Herzog”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, →ISBN