jovially

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

jovial +‎ -ly

Adverb[edit]

jovially (comparative more jovially, superlative most jovially)

  1. In a jovial manner
    • c. 1605, Ben Jonson, Volpone, Act V, Scene 7, in The Workes of Beniamin Jonson, London: Will Stansby, 1616, p. 523,[1]
      The seasoning of a play is the applause.
      Now, though the Foxe be punish’d by the lawes,
      He, yet, doth hope there is not suffring due,
      For any fact, which he hath done ’gainst you;
      If there be, sensure him: here he, doubtfull, stands.
      If not, fare iouially, and clap your hands.
    • 1628, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Henry Cripps, 3rd edition, Part I, Section 2, Member 2, Subsection 6,[2]
      [] this enforced solitarinesse takes place, and produceth his effect soonest in such, as haue spent their time Iouially peraduenture in all honest recreations, in good company, in some great family, or populous citty, & are vpon a sudden confined to a desert country cottage farre off, restrained of their liberty, and barred from their ordinary associates: solitarinesse is very irkesome to such, most tedious, and a sudden cause of great inconuenience.
    • 1724, Daniel Defoe, A General History of the Pirates, London: T. Warner, 2nd edition, Chapter 16, p. 392,[3]
      After they had put their Affairs in a proper Disposition aboard, they went ashore to a little Village for Refreshments, and lived jovially the remaining Part of the Day, at a Tavern, spending three Pistols, and then departed.
    • 1887, Edgar Fawcett, The Confessions of Claud, Boston: Ticknor, Chapter 2, p. 38,[4]
      A few of the men were jovially drunk, a few of them savagely so.
    • 1955, Joseph Heller, Catch-22, Chapter 13, page 133
      He greeted Milo jovially each time they met and, in an excess of contrite generosity, impulsively recommended Major Major for promotion. The recommendation was rejected at once at Twenty-seventh Air Force Headquarters by ex-P.F.C. Wintergreen, who scribbled a brusque, unsigned reminder that the Army had only one Major Major Major Major and did not intend to lose him by promotion just to please Colonel Cathcart.