leeward

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

lee (side away from the wind) +‎ -ward (direction)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈliːwɜ(ɹ)d/, (nautical) IPA(key): /ˈl(j)uːɜ(ɹ)d/

Adjective[edit]

leeward (comparative more leeward, superlative most leeward or leewardmost)

  1. On the side sheltered from the wind; in that direction.

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Adverb[edit]

leeward (comparative more leeward, superlative most leeward)

  1. Away from the direction from which the wind is blowing. Downwind.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chapter 23:
      Some hours after midnight, the Typhoon abated so much, that through the strenuous exertions of Starbuck and Stubb—one engaged forward and the other aft—the shivered remnants of the jib and fore and main-top-sails were cut adrift from the spars, and went eddying away to leeward, like the feathers of an albatross, which sometimes are cast to the winds when that storm-tossed bird is on the wing.
    • ca. 1909, Mark Twain, Letters from the Earth, Letter VIII:
      No lady goat is safe from criminal assault, even on the Sabbath Day, when there is a genteman goat within three miles to leeward of her and nothing in the way but a fence fourteen feet high ...

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