maestra

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian maestra, female form of maestro.

Noun[edit]

maestra (plural maestras)

  1. A female maestro.
    • 1872, “Editorial Department”, “Album Literature”, in The Ladies’ Repository, a Universalist Monthly Magazine for the Home Circle, volume XLVII, Boston: The Universalist Publishing House, page 392, column 1:
      “That is fair,” we say of a rhymed page that sounds as if it might have been indited to the fair Caroline and she only. But the maestra curls her lip contemptuously and utters “umph! Pope!” We are shy of gems. If, therefore, we attribute to Moore what rightly belongs to the scribe here recorded, may his shade forgive us, and appreciate the compliment./ [] / “The interesting feature of the book,” said the maestra, “is its ministerial records. Do you notice what an assembly of the saints is there represented?”
    • 1874 May 1, “Bible Visits in Madrid”, in L. N. R., editor, The Missing Link Magazine, or Bible Work at Home and Abroad, volume X, London: The Book Society, page 142:
      Four o’clock struck, and I and my young companions were setting out when the maestra stopped us. “Where are you going?” she said; “to hear a sermon? These girls must not go without leave.” [] The manager used to watch as she passed with her Bible in her hand, and tell her that she must never bring that book to the factory. She told him she had a right to bring her Bible to read in the intervals of her work, and she would do it, come what might. The maestra used to tell her that she would turn her out if she ever brought a book or tract with her; but Antonia conciliated her with little attentions, and now the woman has actually bought a New Testament for herself.
    • 1901, Report of the Philippine Commission to the Secretary of War, page 551:
      The central boys’ school has three native masters and the central girls’ school has two maestras.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

maestra f (plural maestres)

  1. female equivalent of maestru

Bikol Central[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish maestra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ma‧es‧tra
  • IPA(key): /maˈestɾa/

Noun[edit]

maestra

  1. female equivalent of maestro
    Synonym: propesora
  2. (by extension) teacher
    Synonyms: paratukdo, paraturo

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish maestra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ma‧es‧tra
  • IPA(key): /maˈɛstɾa/, [mʌˈɛs̪t̪ɾ̪ʌ]

Noun[edit]

maestra

  1. female equivalent of maestro
  2. (humorous) a single mother

Verb[edit]

maestra

  1. to be a teacher; to become a teacher; to study to become a teacher

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:maestra.


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈɛ.stra/, /maˈe.stra/[1]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛstra, -estra
  • Hyphenation: ma‧è‧stra, ma‧é‧stra

Noun[edit]

maestra f (plural maestre)

  1. female equivalent of maestro

References[edit]

  1. ^ maestra in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈestɾa/, [maˈes.t̪ɾa]

Adjective[edit]

maestra

  1. feminine singular of maestro

Noun[edit]

maestra f (plural maestras)

  1. female equivalent of maestro
  2. queen bee

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish maestra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ma‧es‧tra
  • IPA(key): /maˈestɾa/, [mɐˈestɾɐ]

Noun[edit]

maestra

  1. female equivalent of maestro