midden

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See also: midden-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English midding, myddyng, from Old Danish mykdyngja, (a compound of Old Norse myk, myki (muck, manure) and dyngja (dung, dungpile)), whence also Danish møgdynge and mødding, Norwegian mødding, dialectal Swedish mödding.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

midden (plural middens)

  1. A dungheap.
  2. A refuse heap usually near a dwelling.
    • 1952, Norman Lewis, Golden Earth:
      Untouched by the decaying middens in which they live, they emerge into the sunshine immaculate and serene. The Burmese must be the best-dressed people in the world.
    • 1979, V. S. Naipaul, A Bend in the River:
      Strange rubbish, not the tins and paper and boxes and other containers you would expect in a town, but a finer kind of waste [] that made the middens look like grey-black mounds of sifted earth.
  3. (archaeology) A prehistoric pile of bones and shells.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a derivative of Proto-Germanic *midjaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *medʰyo-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

midden

  1. in the middle

Derived terms[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

midden

  1. inflection of midd:
    1. strong/weak nominative/accusative masculine singular
    2. weak dative masculine/neuter singular
    3. strong/weak dative plural

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

midden c or n (no plural)

  1. middle (part between beginning and end)

Further reading[edit]

  • midden (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011