mucilage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English muscilage, mussillage, from Middle French mucilage (viscous substance found in vegetable material), from Late Latin mūcilāgō (musty or moldy juice). See Greek μούχλα (moúchla, mold), and related derivatives, for example mushroom, from *meus- (mosses, mold, mildew).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmjuː.sɪ.lɪdʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmju.sɪ.lɪdʒ/, /ˈmju.sə.lɪdʒ/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mucilage (usually uncountable, plural mucilages)

  1. A thick gluey substance (gum) produced by many plants and some microorganisms.
    • 1821, Friedrich Accum, A Treatise on the Art of Brewing, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, & Brown, page 5:
      Malt liquors [] are distinguished from wine, chiefly by the larger quantity of mucilage and saccharine matter []

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin mūcilāgo

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mucilage m (usually uncountable, plural mucilages)

  1. mucilage

Descendants[edit]

  • Turkish: müsilaj

Further reading[edit]