gom

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See also: gôm, gồm, and göm

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Irish gámaí (booby, dolt).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gom (plural goms)

  1. (Ireland) A foolish person.
    • 1917, Mary Brigid Pearse, The Murphys of Ballystack (Dublin : M.H. Gill) p.139:
      “ Ye don’t how how to dhrive a mothor car ! ” shouted Miles, losing his temper completely. “ What a gom ye are ! ”
    • 1926, Seán O'Casey, The Plough and the Stars, Act II, 173:
      Fluther: ... You must think Fluther's a right gom.
    • 2007, John Maher, The Luck Penny, page 145:
      And that's the why I made up my mind to go out to Willie Hill's. To stand my ground in front of that little minx. Because I felt, to tell the God's truth, that little Lorna Lovegrove, out in Willie Hill's, was making a right gom out of me.
    • 2013, Outrageous Pride →ISBN
      He had a sinking feeling that he'd made a right gom of himself, hanging onto her until the last before she departed []
    • 2014, Martha Long, Ma, I'm Gettin Meself a New Mammy →ISBN:
      "Yeah! She's a right gom! Sister Eleanor probably got her an old-age pensioner to keep her company for the Christmas!"

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of gum.

Noun[edit]

gom (plural goms)

  1. (Appalachia) Alternative form of gum
    • 1911, Why moles have hands, in The Wit and Humor of America, edited by Marshall Pinckney Wilder, page 206:
      ev'y toof in his jaws gwine come bustin' thu his goms widout nair' a ache er a pain ter let him know dey's dar.

Etymology 3[edit]

Minced oath.

Interjection[edit]

gom

  1. (obsolete, euphemistic) God!
    • 1804, an entry in the Theatrical Journal of The European Magazine: And London Review, volume 45, page 373:
      There's a Lad, too, from York— but tho' he's a strange elf, / By gom! I respect him as much as myself,
    • 1829, The Humours of Vauxhall, in The Universal Songster, Or Museum of Mirth, volume 2, page 164:
      O dang it, Roger, did 'e ever see sich a sight afore? My gom! what a glorious lumination like! My goles! what a mort of gentry-folk!
    • 1861, The Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer, volumes 9-10, page 36:
      "l'll drink as much cider as you 'plase, but by gom, sir, you munna come here to bork the trees over again."
    • 1908, Edmund Mackenzie Sneyd-Kynnersley, H. M. I.: Some Passages in the Life of One of H. M. Inspectors of Schools, page 224:
      Robert took courage : "Eh, by gom, no. It wasn't hereabouts."

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gom, from Middle Dutch gomme, from Old French gomme, from Late Latin gumma, from earlier gummi, cummi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gom (uncountable)

  1. Gum, a viscous or sticky substance exuded by certain plants or produced synthetically.

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch gomme, from Old French gomme, from Late Latin gumma, from earlier gummi, cummi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɣɔm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: gom
  • Rhymes: -ɔm

Noun[edit]

gom m (plural gommen, diminutive gommetje n)

  1. gum, various viscous or sticky substances exuded by certain plants or produced synthetically.
  2. an object made from gum
  3. Dated spelling of gum (eraser).
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: gom
  • Japanese: ゴム

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

gom

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gommen
  2. imperative of gommen

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English guma.

Noun[edit]

gom

  1. Alternative form of gome (man)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse gaumr.

Noun[edit]

gom

  1. Alternative form of gome (regard)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Anglo-Norman gome.

Noun[edit]

gom

  1. Alternative form of gumme

Rohingya[edit]

Verb[edit]

gom

  1. good

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Mon-Khmer *kom ~ *koom (to grow, to increase); cognate with Bahnar akŏm/akŭm (to meet together, to gather things), Mon ကောံ (kɒm, to assemble, come together) and Khmer ចង្កោម (cɑngkaom, bunch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gom ()

  1. to gather together

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Noun[edit]

gom

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Irish gámaí.

Noun[edit]

gom

  1. idiot, fool

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole, William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, 1867, →ISBN