off-licence

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: off licence

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From that the stores have a licence to sell alcohol for consumption off the premises.

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

off-licence (plural off-licences)

  1. (Ireland, Britain) A shop selling alcohol for consumption only off the premises.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, volume 1, London: James R. Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., page 40:
      Rolliver's inn, the single alehouse at this end of the long and broken village, could only boast of an off-license; hence, as nobody could legally drink on the premises, the amount of overt accommodation for consumers was strictly limited to a little board about six inches wide and two yards long, fixed to the garden palings by pieces of wire, so as to form a ledge.
    • 1992, Robert Rankin, The Antipope (page 123)
      After six such encounters in tiny corner shops which normally complained that they were out of sugar, that the cornflakes were late in again and that they couldn't get tomato sauce for love nor money, the Captain, his head reeling, had staggered into the High Street off-licence.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]