pikey

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

pike +‎ -y.

Noun[edit]

pikey ‎(plural pikeys)

  1. (informal) A pike (fish).
    • 1867, Francis, A book on angling, page 93:
      The first time he comes to the surface of the water he gasps for breath, his huge mouth gapes, he gives his head a shake and out tumbles the bait, hooks and all, not one of them having had hold, and away goes pikey quite satisfied with his entertainment pro tem., and wondering what that ugly two-legged moster with the hop pole in his hand, and who looked in such a state of perplexity and stew, had to do with the matter
    • 1881, Robert Lloyd Patterson, The Birds, Fishes & Cetacea of Belfast Lough, page 226:
      In 1876, in twelve fishings in the same months, there were caught 31 Pikeys, 4 Spotted Dogs, and 441 Nowds.
    • 2011, Jim Nally, Big Fat Gypsy Weddings, ISBN 1444729853:
      A pikey's a pike. It's the dirtiest fish in the water.
    • 2015, E.M. Grant, Grant's Guide to Fishes: The Fisherman's Bible, ISBN 1925271706:
      The boated Pikey makes a series of tailstands as it lunges about, biting at feet, bags, hands, creels and thwarts.

Adjective[edit]

pikey ‎(comparative more pikey, superlative most pikey)

  1. Associated with or filled with pike (fish).
    • 1865, Henry Cholmondeley-Pennell, The Book of the Pike, page 126:
      Like its schoolboy master, the rod built from the cane then chosen has since had many a narrow escape "by flood and fell," and not a few damaged 'tips,' aye, and 'joints' too; but its main timbers are as sound as ever, and I trust may yet be destined to wave death over many a pikey pool and glittering torrent when the hand that chose them is no longer able to do justice to their supple graces.
    • 1965, The Fishing Gazette [New Series] - Issues 4560-4585, page 14:
      The Broadland waters are pikey waters. There is no doubt that if Norfolk is famous for any one species of fish, then it is for none other than Esox himself, the predatory pike.
    • 1979, Len Cacutt, British Freshwater Fishes: The Story of Their Evolution, page 98:
      The name gar-pike has gone some way to suggest the non-existent relationship, while (two dorsal fins notwithstanding) the pike-perches look remarkably 'pikey'.
    • 2003, Michael Jensen, Fly-Fishing: For Pike, ISBN 0954211790, page 12:
      We travel along tortuous forest roads in the most 'pikey' part ofVarmland — the whole time alongside water.

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from obsolete pike ‎(depart or travel), or possibly from turnpike.[1] The verb is derived from the racist stereotype that gypsies or other travellers are thieves.

Noun[edit]

pikey ‎(plural pikeys)

  1. (Britain, pejorative, offensive) A working-class (often underclass) person; can vary from specifically Irish Travellers to gypsies or travellers from any ethnic background, but now increasingly used for any socially undesirable person, with negative connotations of benefit fraud, theft, single-parent families and living on run-down estates.
    • 1887, Belgravia - Volume 62, page 416:
      Gipsies and the pikey race generally were a class outside Lord Sandbar's previous experience, and he listened greedily.
    • 2011, Jonathan Trigell, Cham (ISBN 1780336810):
      But if there's one thing he hates more than pikeys, it's posh people.
    • 2012, Pat Coppard, In Spite of Everything: a Life-story (ISBN 1467883964), page 15:
      “They must be the pikeys who live up there. They're a nasty bunch. Shouldn't get mixed up with them.” “Well, we told them to fuck off, they didn't seem that nasty to me! What are pikeys anyway?” “Well, they're like vagabonds.”

Adjective[edit]

pikey ‎(comparative more pikey, superlative most pikey)

  1. (Britain, slang, derogatory) Associated with members of the above-mentioned underclass.
    • 2006 September 9, "Huge", in Re: Oh for FU--S sake!, in uk.rec.driving, Usenet:
      Blimey. The least pikey place on the planet.
    • 2007 October 18, "PC Paul", Re: Exhaust security bolts help, in uk.rec.cars.maintenance, Usenet:
      > You could try moving somewhere less pikey?
    • 2012 March 11, "Lieutenant Scott", Re: Definition of "loading" in a parking space, in uk.rec.driving, Usenet, quoting another user:
      >> > No, you're more pikey than a traffic warden.
      >> >> Nothing is more pikey than a traffic warden, even an immigrant.
      >> >> > Not even a Glaswegian?

Verb[edit]

pikey ‎(third-person singular simple present pikeys, present participle pikeying, simple past and past participle pikeyed)

  1. (Britain, slang, derogatory) To steal.
    • 2004 October 25, "Lister", Re: Monday, Monday, Play, Want, Bin, in uk.games.video.misc, Usenet:
      >It's getting hold of a copy that isn't pikeyed that I'm having >difficulty with :-(
    • 2006 September 29, Conor, Re: Car legally removed or stolen?, in uk.rec.cars.misc, Usenet:
      Agree with Adrian about it being Pikeyed. At least you've a cheque to go buy something else.
    • 2007 August 9, "Diablos Rojos", Re: Special offer to all Scummers, in alt.sports.soccer.manchester.united, Usenet:
      Rumour has it that you once posting something interesting that was pikeyed straight from scrotexes lame troll book.
See also[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (2010, ISBN 0199232059), page 218: "From pike verb, perh. in the earlier sense, to depart."