pikey

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

pike +‎ -y.

Noun[edit]

pikey ‎(plural pikeys)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) A pikeman.
    • 1818, Thomas Hudson, Comic Songs, page 15:
      The pike man at Tyburn Gate, About the mill not at all knowing, Cried out, " why you drive a rare rate, Gentlemen, where are you going ?" Says Bill, " why, Pikey, yo ho ! Cup ! hand up the change — all right ; We all on us, if you must know, Are going to see the fight.
    • 2008, John A. Clayton, Cottom and Cold Blood, ISBN 9780955382147, page 45:
      As a pikeman Bill was a member of the team responsible for freeing the coal from the seams and, because the rest of the colliers depended on the 'pikeys' to make progress through the coal face, they had certain privileges. The job of the pikey was hard and dangerous, injuries, not to mention fatalities, ran at a high level in this occupation.
    • 2010, Ted Russ, The Earth Friendly Zen Cookbook:
      “... and seventy-leven pikey men and seven trance poters!” crowed LordJim. We were playing an online game and we had a rank newbie among us, whom we were teasing mercilessly. Nothing like having a game with a newcomer to the game. He was trying to work out how many pikemen and transporters were needed, we were having an amusing private chat on the side, and winding him up as often as possible.
  2. A type of fishing lure, often used for pike.
    • 1943, New Mexico Magazine - Volume 21, page 17:
      I made for my den and grabbed all the black and white River-Runts I had and threw two or three Pikies, two Red-Heads, and some odds and ends in my tackle box and grabbed my boots, casting rod and reel.
    • 1965, Wisconsin Conservation Bulletin - Volumes 30-31, page 47:
      Underwater lures (spoons, silver minnows, daredevils and pikies) are usually the best baits, although as the water warms the northern pike will hit surface lures such as mice and noisy, splashing baits.
  3. (informal) A pike.
    • 1867, Francis, A book on angling, page 93:
      The first time he comes to the surface of the water he gasps for breath, his huge mouth gapes, he gives his head a shake and out tumbles the bait, hooks and all, not one of them having had hold, and away goes pikey quite satisfied with his entertainment pro tem., and wondering what that ugly two-legged moster with the hop pole in his hand, and who looked in such a state of perplexity and stew, had to do with the matter
    • 2011, Jim Nally, Big Fat Gypsy Weddings, ISBN 1444729853:
      A pikey's a pike. It's the dirtiest fish in the water.
    • 2015, E.M. Grant, Grant's Guide to Fishes: The Fisherman's Bible, ISBN 1925271706:
      The boated Pikey makes a series of tailstands as it lunges about, biting at feet, bags, hands, creels and thwarts.

Adjective[edit]

pikey ‎(comparative more pikey, superlative most pikey)

  1. Associated with or filled with pike.
    • 1865, Henry Cholmondeley-Pennell, The Book of the Pike, page 126:
      Like its schoolboy master, the rod built from the cane then chosen has since had many a narrow escape "by flood and fell," and not a few damaged 'tips,' aye, and 'joints' too; but its main timbers are as sound as ever, and I trust may yet be destined to wave death over many a pikey pool and glittering torrent when the hand that chose them is no longer able to do justice to their supple graces.
    • 1965, The Fishing Gazette [New Series] - Issues 4560-4585, page 14:
      The Broadland waters are pikey waters. There is no doubt that if Norfolk is famous for any one species of fish, then it is for none other than Esox himself, the predatory pike.
    • 1979, Len Cacutt, British Freshwater Fishes: The Story of Their Evolution, page 98:
      The name gar-pike has gone some way to suggest the non-existent relationship, while (two dorsal fins notwithstanding) the pike-perches look remarkably 'pikey'.
    • 2003, Michael Jensen, Fly-Fishing: For Pike, ISBN 0954211790, page 12:
      We travel along tortuous forest roads in the most 'pikey' part ofVarmland — the whole time alongside water.

Etymology 2[edit]

From obsolete pike, to depart or travel, or possibly from turnpike This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term. - needs to be confirmed

Noun[edit]

pikey ‎(plural pikeys)

  1. (Britain, pejorative, offensive) A working-class (often underclass) person; can vary from specifically Irish Travellers to gypsies or travellers from any ethnic background, but now increasingly used for any socially undesirable person, with negative connotations of benefit fraud, theft, single-parent families and living on run-down estates.
    • 1887, Belgravia - Volume 62, page 416:
      Gipsies and the pikey race generally were a class outside Lord Sandbar's previous experience, and he listened greedily.
    • 2000, Jeremy Sandford, Rokkering to the Gorjios, ISBN 1902806042, page 84:
      I can remember six Gorjio boys that I taught how to buy a bit of scrap, fed them, clothed them, and they liked the way of life and they became Pikies, they married into our family, they liked our way of life and they stayed with us.
    • 2006, Ramón Spaaij, Understanding Football Hooliganism, ISBN 9056294458, page 151:
      West Ham supporters also sought to denigrate their opponents by mocking the perceived slum character of South East London: 'You live in a caravan', 'Pikies, pikies, pikies', 'No one likes you 'cos you're scum'
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Derived from the stereotype that all gypsies or other travellers are thieves.

Verb[edit]

pikey ‎(third-person singular simple present pikeys, present participle pikeying, simple past and past participle pikeyed)

  1. (Britain, slang, derogatory) To steal.