poltron

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See also: poltrón

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

poltron (plural poltrons)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of poltroon
    • 1716, Thomas Browne, Christian Morals, 2nd edition edited by Samuel Johnson, London: J. Payne, 1756, Part I, p. 35,[1]
      Be not a Hercules furens abroad, and a poltron within thyself.
    • 1792, Thomas Holcroft, Anna St. Ives, London: Shepperson & Reynolds, Volume 4, Letter 71, p. 127,[2]
      She shall find I am not the clay, but the potter. I will mould, not be moulded. Poltron as I was, to think of sinking into the docile, domesticated, timid animal called husband!
    • 1823, Edward Dillingham Bangs, “An oration pronounced at Springfield, Mass., on the Fourth of July, 1823,”[3]
      We were regarded as a nation of poltrons, without the spirit to resent insult, or the power to resist aggression.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian poltrone (lazy (person)).

pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

poltron m, f (plural poltrons)

  1. (pejorative) coward

Adjective[edit]

poltron (feminine singular poltronne, masculine plural poltrons, feminine plural poltronnes)

  1. (pejorative) cowardly

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

poltron m (plural poltrons)

  1. coward

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French poltron (coward), from Italian poltrone (sluggard).

Noun[edit]

poltron m (plural poltrons)

  1. (Jersey) thug