thug

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi ठग (ṭhag, swindler, fraud, cheat).

Thuggee was an Indian network of secret fraternities who were engaged in murdering and robbing travellers and known for strangling their victims, operating from the 17th century (possibly as early as 13th century) to the 19th century. During British Imperial rule of India, many Indian words passed into common English, and in 1810 thug referred to members of these Indian gangs. The sense was adopted more generally as "ruffian, cutthroat" by 1839. See also English thatch, deck.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: thŭg, IPA(key): /θʌɡ/
    • (file)
  • (India) IPA(key): /ʈʰəɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ

Noun[edit]

thug (plural thugs)

  1. A person who is affiliated with a criminal gang or engages in violent criminal activity.
  2. (historical) One of a band of assassins formerly active in northern India who worshipped Kali and sacrificed their victims to her.
    Synonym: phansigar
  3. (horticulture) An overvigorous plant that spreads and dominates the flowerbed.
  4. A violent, aggressive, and truculent criminal.
  5. A wooden bat used in the game of miniten, fitting around the player's hand.
    • 2021, Anna Durand, Natural Satisfaction:
      I pushed up out of my chaise and headed for the miniten court. Leah handed me her thug as I walked past her.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

thug (third-person singular simple present thugs, present participle thugging, simple past and past participle thugged)

  1. To commit acts of thuggery, to live the life of a thug, or to dress and act in a manner reminiscent of someone who does.

Anagrams[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English thug, from Hindi ठग (ṭhag).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thug m or f (plural thugs)

  1. (derogatory) thug, yob.

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

thug

  1. analytic past indicative of tabhair

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 73

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

thug (dependent tug)

  1. past of thoir