procurator

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia en

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Anglo-Norman procuratour, from Latin prōcūrātor, from prōcūrō ‎(I procure) (English procure). Equivalent to procure +‎ -ator.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

procurator ‎(plural procurators)

  1. A tax collector.
  2. An agent or attorney.
  3. A legal officer who both investigates and prosecutes crimes, found in some inquisitorial legal systems, particularly communist or formerly communist states – see public procurator
  4. (Ancient Rome) The governor of a small imperial province.

See also[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • OED2

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From prōcūrō ‎(I manage, administer) +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prōcūrātor m ‎(genitive prōcūrātoris); third declension

  1. manager, overseer, superintendent
  2. agent, deputy

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative prōcūrātor prōcūrātōrēs
genitive prōcūrātōris prōcūrātōrum
dative prōcūrātōrī prōcūrātōribus
accusative prōcūrātōrem prōcūrātōrēs
ablative prōcūrātōre prōcūrātōribus
vocative prōcūrātor prōcūrātōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • procurator in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • procurator in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • PROCURATOR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • procurator in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • procurator” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • procurator in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin