prorogation

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman prorogation, Middle French prorogation, and their source, Latin prōrogātiō (extension, postponement).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəʊɹəˈɡeɪʃn̩/

Noun[edit]

prorogation (countable and uncountable, plural prorogations)

  1. Causing something to last longer or remain in effect longer; prolongation, continuance. [from 15th c.]
  2. (politics) The action of proroguing an assembly, especially a parliament; discontinuance of meetings for a given period of time, without dissolution. [from 15th c.]
    • 2019 September 10, Kate Lyons, “Brexit: chants of 'shame' as suspension of parliament descends into chaos”, in The Guardian[1]:
      There were extraordinary scenes of chaos and anger in the House of Commons overnight as opposition MPs staged a protest against the suspension of parliament for five weeks – a prorogation that the Speaker of the House said represented “an act of executive fiat”.
  3. (politics) The period of such a discontinuance between two sessions of a legislative body. [from 16th c.]
  4. (now rare) Deferral to a later time; postponement. [from 15th c.]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

When a legislature or parliament is prorogued, it is still constituted (that is, all members remain as members and a general election is not necessary), but all orders of the body (bills, motions, etc.) are expunged.

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōrogātiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

prorogation f (plural prorogations)

  1. (politics) prorogation

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]