prude

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Prude, prudě, prüde, and пруде

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prude, from Old French prude, prode, feminine of prou, prod, prud (good, excellent, brave), from Latin [Term?]. Related to proud but unrelated to prudent.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: pro͞od, IPA(key): /pɹuːd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːd

Noun[edit]

prude (plural prudes)

  1. A person who is or tries to be excessively proper, especially one who is easily offended by matters of a sexual nature.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, IV [Uniform ed., p. 62]:
      He became shy. "I hadn't meant to tell you. It's not quite for a lady." For, like most men who are rather animal, he was intellectually a prude.
    • 1991, Robert M. Pirsig, Lila:
      If you didn't go for Lila you're some kind of prissy old prude. If you did go for her you were some kind of dirty old man.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prude (comparative more prude, superlative most prude)

  1. Prudish.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prude (plural prudes)

  1. prude

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpru.de/
  • Rhymes: -ude
  • Hyphenation: prù‧de

Verb[edit]

prude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of prudere

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prude

  1. feminine singular of pruz